Coding Common Pregnancy Complications: Ectopic Pregnancy by Traci Vela

Pregnancy is a beautiful time for most women, but there is a plethora of complications that may present themselves during each trimester. Every woman is unique, every pregnancy is different, and therefore nothing should be assumed when coding pregnancy complications. This article will focus on ectopic pregnancy, which is somewhat rare, but affects roughly 1 in every 50 pregnancies according to the March of Dimes.[1]

Ectopic Pregnancy

An ectopic pregnancy is clinically defined as, “A condition in which a fertilized egg grows outside of the uterus, usually in one of the fallopian tubes; A potentially life-threatening condition in which the embryo, mammalian implants outside the cavity of the uterus. They can be in other locations, such as uterine cervix; ovary; and abdominal cavity (pregnancy, abdominal).” It’s also defined as, “An abnormal pregnancy in which the egg is implanted anywhere outside the corpus uteri; Development of a fertilized ovum outside of the uterine cavity; and the state or condition of having a developing embryo or fetus in the body (outside the uterus), after union of an ovum and spermatozoon, during the period from conception to birth.”[2]

Symptoms of ectopic pregnancy vary. Some women experience all of the following symptoms, some only a few, but they may include sharp pain on one side of the abdomen, shoulder pain, feelings of faintness or dizziness, and vaginal bleeding.

For women with an ectopic pregnancy, the fertilized egg grows in an atypical place, outside the uterus (also called the womb), but usually within the fallopian tubes (>96 percent). The result is almost always a miscarriage. Ectopic pregnancy is classified in most cases as a medical emergency if it ruptures.

A pregnant woman should seek medical attention right away if she experiences these signs. Doctors use drugs, such as methotrexate, or surgery (rarer)[3] to remove the ectopic tissue so that organ damage does not occur. However, many women who have suffered ectopic pregnancies often enjoy healthy pregnancies in the future, provided that permanent damage is not done to the reproductive organs.

ICD-10 Codes for ectopic pregnancies are as follows:

O00: Ectopic pregnancy

  •  O00.0: Abdominal pregnancy
    •  O00.00: …… without intrauterine pregnancy
    •  O00.01: …… with intrauterine pregnancy
  •  O00.1: Tubal pregnancy
    •  O00.10: Tubal pregnancy without intrauterine pregnancy
      •  O00.101: Right tubal pregnancy without intrauterine pregnancy
      •  O00.102: Left tubal pregnancy without intrauterine pregnancy
      •  O00.109: Unspecified tubal pregnancy without intrauterine pregnancy
    •  O00.11: Tubal pregnancy with intrauterine pregnancy
      •  O00.111: Right tubal pregnancy with intrauterine pregnancy
      •  O00.112: Left tubal pregnancy with intrauterine pregnancy
      •  O00.119: Unspecified tubal pregnancy with intrauterine pregnancy
  •  O00.2: Ovarian pregnancy
    •  O00.20: Ovarian pregnancy without intrauterine pregnancy
      •  O00.201: Right ovarian pregnancy without intrauterine pregnancy
      •  O00.202: Left ovarian pregnancy without intrauterine pregnancy
      •  O00.209: Unspecified ovarian pregnancy without intrauterine pregnancy
    •  O00.21: Ovarian pregnancy with intrauterine pregnancy
      •  O00.211: Right ovarian pregnancy with intrauterine pregnancy
      •  O00.212: Left ovarian pregnancy without intrauterine pregnancy
      •  O00.219: Unspecified ovarian pregnancy with intrauterine pregnancy
  •  O00.8: Other ectopic pregnancy
    •  O00.80: …… without intrauterine pregnancy
    •  O00.81: …… with intrauterine pregnancy
  •  O00.9: Ectopic pregnancy, unspecified
    •  O00.90: Unspecified ectopic pregnancy without intrauterine pregnancy
    •  O00.91: Unspecified ectopic pregnancy with intrauterine pregnancy

[1] https://www.marchofdimes.org/complications/ectopic-pregnancy.aspx

[2] http://www.icd10data.com/ICD10CM/Codes/O00-O9A/O00-O08/O00-

[3] https://www.uptodate.com/contents/ectopic-pregnancy-epidemiology-risk-factors-and-anatomic-sites